American Literature

books, literature, stories, thoughts

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"One’s craft, one’s art, is his expression, not one’s person." Henry James
No More Questions: A Brief History of Author Interviews: The New Yorker

"One’s craft, one’s art, is his expression, not one’s person." Henry James
No More Questions: A Brief History of Author Interviews: The New Yorker

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"Edmund Wilson once called James M Cain (1892-1977) one of America’s "poets of the tabloid murder". After Dashiell Hammett and Raymond Chandler Cain is the writer most often credited with defining the "hard-boiled", the tough-talking, fast-moving urban stories of violence, sex and money that characterised so much popular film and fiction in America during the 1930s and 40s. Unlike Hammett and Chandler, however, Cain did not focus his fiction on the consoling figure of the detective bringing a semblance of order to all that urban chaos. His novels are told from the perspective of the confused, usually ignorant, all-too-corruptible central actors in his lurid dramas of betrayal and murder. His first two novels, The Postman Always Rings Twice and Double Indemnity, were narrated by men destroyed by femmes fatales; both were made into enormously successful films, especially Billy Wilder’s now-classic Double Indemnity, starring Fred MacMurray and Barbara Stanwyck in an improbable blonde wig." (Sarah Churchwell)
http://www.theguardian.com/books/2011/jun/24/mildred-pierce-sarah-churchwell-rereading

Filed under Great Depression Popular literature 1930s